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Minor Closed Fractures

Minor Closed Fractures
The term fracture designates the interruption of a bone’s continuity. A bone fracture is frequently referred to as a broken bone. The shape and integrity of the bone can also be changed due to fractures. A closed fracture means that part of your bone is broken, but the skin is intact. Even though a closed fracture does not penetrate the skin, it can still be severe because of bone and soft tissue injury. A minor bone fracture is a simple bruise with a hair-like crack in it.

Pathophysiology

Minor closed fractures can occur due to repetitive tissue stress. These fractures are also known as stress fractures. Some fractures originate from the abnormal resorption of bone due to an imbalance in hormones controlling calcium deposition and resorption. These kinds of fractures are most common in the elderly population. The pathophysiology of such fractures depends upon many factors that modulate bone strength, bone density, and bone mass.

Bone fractures can also occur when the applied force over the bone is more than the bone strength. Both internal and external factors play a role in bone fracture. External factors include the rate at which force is applied on the bone along with duration, direction, and magnitude. Internal factors include bone strength, energy-absorbing capacity, strength, elasticity, and fatigue.

Breaks may also occur in areas already affected by previous disease, such as bone cysts or malignant tumors. Theis type of fracture is called a pathological fracture.

Causes

The most common causes of minor closed fractures are are trauma, osteoporosis, and overuse. Trauma includes a fall, sports injury, or motorvehicle accident. Osteoporosis weakens your bone and is an acquired condition characterized by reduced bone mass. In addition, it leads to bone fragility. Overuse fractures are typically associated with sports or athletic activities, but can also occur due to other repetitive motions.

Treatment

Most common bone fractures fractures can easily be treated through immobilization of bones by splinting or casting.

Severe pain due to fractures is treated immediately by giving painkillers. Anti-inflammatories are frequently used for this purpose, If the fracture involves an isolated extremity, then regional anesthesia is sometimes used to relieve pain.

After providing initial treatments, fractures are reduced, immobilized, and treated symptomatically. Misalignment, angular dislocation, and displacement of bone due to fracture can easily be treated by reduction (realignment of bone). This process requires analgesia and sedation. Closed reduction of fracture is maintained by casting. Rest may prevent further injury and help in healing.

Treatment of a minor-closed fracture includes treating any associated injuries. For example, if an injury occurs to the blood vessels or nerves during the fracture, surgical intervention may be required.

Physical therapy may be prescribed after bone healing to aid in returning the affected area to full function. Facial abrasions and considered more serious as these have a higher risk of cicatrization and should be cleaned,debrided, and dressed daily. Dressings may require skin adhesives like the combination of gum mastic, styrax,alcohol, and methyl salicylate or tincture of benzoin.

Contact us

In case of urgent medical care assistance, AfterOurs Urgent Care offers immediate telemedicine services, where medical providers are available to offer assistance. Anyone who experiences signs and symptoms requiring urgent medical attention can simply book their appointment with AfterOurs Urgent Care to directly talk to an expert. If your medical issue is not appropriate for telemedicine, we will let you know and refer you to an in-person facility.

When to visit a doctor:
If you are feeling severe pain and observe swelling after a physical injury to your bone, you should see a medical provider in order to avoid possible serious complications.

Treatment for minor-closed fractures is available at AfterOurs Urgent Care.